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On Augustine and the theocratic worldview

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Augustine and the theocratic worldview

  Habit, if not restricted, soon becomes necessity. ~Augustine of Hippo Biography St. Augustine of Hippo (354-430), the Christian philosopher and theologian is most remembered for his two classics in Christian apologetics, The Confessions and The City of God. Next to the writers of the New Testament, he is the most respected Christian writer. The […]

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On Plotinus and immortality

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Plotinus and immortality

  Now I shall endeavor to make that which is divine in me rise up to that which is divine in the universe. ~Plotinus (last words) I become a Christian on this date 38 years ago, August 8, 1976. ~Ellis Washington Biography Plotinus (c. 205–270) was a foremost philosopher of the ancient world. In his […]

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On Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler: when science wasn’t politics

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler: when science wasn’t politics

  Astronomy and religion have quite separate tasks, one teaching how the heavens go, the other how to go to heaven. ~Cardinal Barberini to Galileo Prologue: Science and scientists weren’t always like they are today – tools of the Leviathan socialist and progressive governments from whom most derive their livelihoods through government grants and through […]

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On Tacitus and the tyranny of monarchy and democracy

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Tacitus and the tyranny of monarchy and democracy

  By Ellis Washington The more corrupt the state, the more numerous the laws. A shocking crime was committed on the unscrupulous initiative of few individuals, with the blessing of more, and amid the passive acquiescence of all [e.g., democracy]. ~Tacitus Prologue: Biography Publius (or Gaius) Cornelius Tacitus (c. AD 56 – after 117) was […]

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On Plutarch and the idea of citizen

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Plutarch and the idea of citizen

By Ellis Washington It is not histories I am writing, but lives; and in the most glorious deeds there is not always an indication of virtue or vice, indeed a small thing like a phrase or a jest often makes a greater revelation of a character than battles where thousands die.” ~Plutarch (Life of Alexander/Life […]

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The Old Man, America, and the Sea of Iraq

| August 7, 2014 | 0 Comments

“You did not kill the fish only to keep alive and to sell for food, he thought. You killed him for pride and because you are a fisherman. You loved him when he was alive and you loved him after. If you love him, it is not a sin to kill him. Or is it […]

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On Virgil and the necessity of good language

| June 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Virgil and the necessity of good language

It is easy to go down into Hell; night and day, the gates of dark Death stand wide; but to climb back again, to retrace one’s steps to the upper air – there’s the rub, the task. ~ Virgil Prologue: Biography Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC), in English […]

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On Lucretius, Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius and the nature of life and death

| June 16, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Lucretius, Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius and the nature of life and death

“Again we are all sprung from a heavenly seed, all have that same Father…” ~ Lucretius, On the Nature of Things, Book II If thou art pained by any external thing, it is not this that disturbs thee, but thy own judgment about it. And it is in thy power to wipe out this judgment […]

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On Apollonius, Nicomachus and first principles

| June 11, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Apollonius, Nicomachus and first principles

Apollonius image of conic sections and the question of orbital motion *N.B.: This essay is based in part on ideas from Great Books of the Western World, Robert Maynard Hutchins, Editor-in-Chief (1952), Vol. 3, chap. 70 – Principle and Vol. 11 – Apollonius of Perga and Nicomachus of Gerasa. “All that has by nature with […]

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On Euclid, Archimedes and first principles

| June 3, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Euclid, Archimedes and first principles

*N.B.: This essay is based in part on ideas from Great Books of the Western World, Robert Maynard Hutchins, Editor-in-Chief (1952), Vol. 3, chap. 70 – Principle and Vol. 11 – Euclid and Archimedes“Give him a coin since he must needs make gain by what he learns.” ~ Euclid Prologue: Biography Euclid (fl. c. 300 […]

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