Recent Articles

On Shakespeare: King Lear, Macbeth and Obama

| November 23, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Shakespeare: King Lear, Macbeth and Obama

  I am a man more sinned against than sinning. ~ King Lear But screw your courage to the sticking-place, And we’ll not fail. ~ Lady Macbeth Prologue This is part II of my essay on William Shakespeare (1564–1616) the great English playwright, poet, and actor, celebrated as the most outstanding writer in the English […]

Continue Reading

Black Chicago activists destroy liberal fascism

| November 23, 2014 | 0 Comments
Black Chicago activists destroy liberal fascism

  The only thing they’re offering the Black community is abortion on demand. This is what president [Obama] is asking us to vote for? ~ Paul McKinley, Illinois GOP Congressional Candidate (2014) Four Black Chicago activists went on record with Rebel Pundit to expose the liberal fascist agenda of the Democrat Socialist Party. Paul McKinley, […]

Continue Reading

Ronald Reagan: 50th anniversary of speech that launched the conservative revolution

| November 23, 2014 | 0 Comments
Ronald Reagan: 50th anniversary of speech that launched the conservative revolution

  If we lose that war, and in so doing lose this way of freedom of ours, history will record with the greatest astonishment that those who had the most to lose did the least to prevent its happening. [Cuban refuge to Reagan’s friends] I had someplace to escape to. ~ Ronald Reagan, A Time […]

Continue Reading

On Shakespeare: Richard III & Julius Caesar

| November 23, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Shakespeare: Richard III & Julius Caesar

  Shakespeare was not of an age, but for all time. ~ Ben Johnson Biography William Shakespeare (1564–1616) was an English playwright, poet, and actor, celebrated as the most outstanding writer in the English language and the world’s greatest dramatist. Known as England’s national poet and the “Bard of Avon.” Although the source of some […]

Continue Reading

On Montaigne: the father of psychological essays

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Montaigne: the father of psychological essays

  A man who fears suffering is already suffering from what he fears. ~ Montaigne Biography Michel Eyquem de Montaigne (1533–1592) was a giant of the French Renaissance, the cultural and artistic movement in France between the 15th and early 17th centuries, and one of the most important writers of that period celebrated for promoting […]

Continue Reading

On Rabelais: A precursor to Oscar Wilde and the celebrity culture

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Rabelais: A precursor to Oscar Wilde and the celebrity culture

  It was from Lady Wilde that Oscar learned that identity is a kind of fiction, and that being oneself is a form of playacting. It was from her that Oscar [Wilde] learned that the most important act of creativity is the creation of one’s own image. He learned from his mother that the most […]

Continue Reading

On Hobbes and the Leviathan who devours men

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Hobbes and the Leviathan who devours men

  It is not wisdom but authority that makes law. During the time men live without a common power to keep them all in awe, they are in that conditions called war; and such a war, as if of every man, against every man. ~ Hobbes Biography Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), was an English philosopher, scholar […]

Continue Reading

On Machiavelli and the ends justify the means to liberal fascism

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Machiavelli and the ends justify the means to liberal fascism

  It is better to be feared than to be loved. I’m not interested in preserving the status quo; I want to overthrow it. ~ Machiavelli Biography Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli (1469-1527) was an Italian Renaissance writer, humanist, diplomat, philosopher, historian, and politician, centered in Florence. As an official in the Florentine Republic, with […]

Continue Reading

On Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and the complexities of human nature

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and the complexities of human nature

  Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343–1400), known as the Father of English literature, is commonly called the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages and was the first poet to be buried in Poet’s Corner of Westminster Abbey. Although he attained recognition during his lifetime as a philosopher, astronomer, alchemist and author, writing a scientific treatise […]

Continue Reading

On Dante’s Divine Comedy and the evil of neutrality

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Dante’s Divine Comedy and the evil of neutrality

  The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of great moral crisis, maintain their neutrality. ~ Dante Biography Dante Alighieri (c. 1265–1321), was the foremost Italian poet of the Middle Ages. His epic poem, Divine Comedy, is universally considered the greatest literary work composed in the Italian language and a […]

Continue Reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers: