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On Dante’s Divine Comedy and the evil of neutrality

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Dante’s Divine Comedy and the evil of neutrality

  The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of great moral crisis, maintain their neutrality. ~ Dante Biography Dante Alighieri (c. 1265–1321), was the foremost Italian poet of the Middle Ages. His epic poem, Divine Comedy, is universally considered the greatest literary work composed in the Italian language and a […]

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On Aquinas first principles: ethics, natural law and truth

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Aquinas first principles: ethics, natural law and truth

  The natural law is nothing else than the rational creature’s participation in the eternal law. ~ Aquinas . . . [T]he Law of Nature and of Nature’s God. ~ Thomas Jefferson, Declaration of Independence (1776) Biography Aquinas, Saint Thomas (ca. 1225 – d. 1274), was a priest and Dominican friar born in Roccasecca, Italy. […]

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Muslim Brotherhood = Devout [not radical] Islam, Part II

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
Muslim Brotherhood = Devout [not radical] Islam, Part II

  The Führer confirmed that the “struggle against a Jewish homeland in Palestine would be part of the struggle against the Jews.” ~Grand Mufti, German Newsreel, Nov. 28, 1941 This essay will conclusively chronical the historical facts and details that the modern incantation of devout Islam – from the early 1900s-9/11, up to the early […]

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Muslim Brotherhood = Devout [not radical] Islam, Part I

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
Muslim Brotherhood = Devout [not radical] Islam, Part I

  “Allah is our objective; the Qur’an is the Constitution; the Prophet is our leader; jihad is our way; death for the sake of Allah is our wish.” ~Muslim Brotherhood official slogan Prologue to Muslim duplicity and treachery From the rise of “radical” (i.e., devout) Islam in the early 1900s to 9/11, conventional media coverage […]

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On Augustine and the theocratic worldview

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Augustine and the theocratic worldview

  Habit, if not restricted, soon becomes necessity. ~Augustine of Hippo Biography St. Augustine of Hippo (354-430), the Christian philosopher and theologian is most remembered for his two classics in Christian apologetics, The Confessions and The City of God. Next to the writers of the New Testament, he is the most respected Christian writer. The […]

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On Plotinus and immortality

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Plotinus and immortality

  Now I shall endeavor to make that which is divine in me rise up to that which is divine in the universe. ~Plotinus (last words) I become a Christian on this date 38 years ago, August 8, 1976. ~Ellis Washington Biography Plotinus (c. 205–270) was a foremost philosopher of the ancient world. In his […]

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On Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler: when science wasn’t politics

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Ptolemy, Copernicus, Kepler: when science wasn’t politics

  Astronomy and religion have quite separate tasks, one teaching how the heavens go, the other how to go to heaven. ~Cardinal Barberini to Galileo Prologue: Science and scientists weren’t always like they are today – tools of the Leviathan socialist and progressive governments from whom most derive their livelihoods through government grants and through […]

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On Tacitus and the tyranny of monarchy and democracy

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Tacitus and the tyranny of monarchy and democracy

  By Ellis Washington The more corrupt the state, the more numerous the laws. A shocking crime was committed on the unscrupulous initiative of few individuals, with the blessing of more, and amid the passive acquiescence of all [e.g., democracy]. ~Tacitus Prologue: Biography Publius (or Gaius) Cornelius Tacitus (c. AD 56 – after 117) was […]

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On Plutarch and the idea of citizen

| November 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Plutarch and the idea of citizen

By Ellis Washington It is not histories I am writing, but lives; and in the most glorious deeds there is not always an indication of virtue or vice, indeed a small thing like a phrase or a jest often makes a greater revelation of a character than battles where thousands die.” ~Plutarch (Life of Alexander/Life […]

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On Virgil and the necessity of good language

| June 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
On Virgil and the necessity of good language

It is easy to go down into Hell; night and day, the gates of dark Death stand wide; but to climb back again, to retrace one’s steps to the upper air – there’s the rub, the task. ~ Virgil Prologue: Biography Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC), in English […]

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